Momma Knows Best

My hands reached for books,
Words have filled my head.
Boys like smart girls,
At least, that’s what momma said.

She had her plans,
A life filled with ribbons and pearls.
College is meant to meet boys;
Because after all, we’re only girls.

Momma, I tried,
I swear I never meant to,
But somewhere along the way
I realized I had a brain, too.

Those books gave me thoughts,
Ideas of my own.
And now I long for to do more
Than spend my days in our home.

But now I’m so torn,
Because all of my life,
I always dreamed of being a mother and wife.

So I jumped into it;
I said “I do,”
He said he loved me
And sometimes I thought it was true.

He told me I was pretty,
I was all he had hoped for;
But no one knew what happened behind closed doors.

I longed for more,
But I tucked it away.
I knew I was lying
Each and every damn day.

I know I’m young,
I’ve got so much left to do.
I’m only twenty-three,
And I’ve already disappointed you.

I wore the pretty dress,
Momma, I read the lines.
I tried so hard,
But I also have a mind.

I long to learn,
To explore and discover.
And all these lost years,
Well they’ll never be recovered.

Momma I tried,
I promise you, I really did.
But it turns out boys don’t like girls
With this many thoughts in their head.

Technically, I’m running.
So yeah, I guess you’re right.
But I can’t fix this
And I don’t wanna fight.

I long for my freedom,
For the wind in my hair.
And we both know I could never explore
If I would have stayed there.

So I’m hitting the road,
I’m turning my back on that man.
And I guess I’ve kind of ruined
The future you had planned.

I hope one day you’ll get it,
You look at me and understand.
I’ve always felt like myself,
With a book in my hand.

I know someone will love me,
They’ll want to hear the thoughts in my head.
When we have a daughter,
She’ll say, “that’s what momma said.”

I’ll tell her to think,
To be courageous and be strong.
I’ll tell her thinking for yourself,
Well that’s never wrong.

I’ll look at her dad,
Wrap my hands around his waist.
I’ll tell her running away,
Was the best difficulty I’ve ever faced.

These mistakes led me to him,
And in turn gave me you.
I’ll say, “maybe after all,
That’s what momma knew.”

 

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Lazy Sunday Wisdom with Calvin and Hobbes

You’re in luck, there’s a double dose of Calvin and Hobbes this week.

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Calvin and Hobbes really like to get into the nitty-gritty of life while keeping that childlike charm alive; it’s quite admirable. I love how Calvin’s dad is honest with his son; sure he might be stalling, but we all do. Life isn’t as black and white as it may sometimes seem. We might as well be honest about it, It’s easy to have an opinion when you don’t have to support it. But when you’re required to own up to your beliefs, the situation can get a bit sticky and oftentimes we try to keep the peace by avoiding that which makes us uncomfortable.  It’s human nature to want to stay in our little comfort zone; Calvin’s dad is merely showcasing what we are prone to doing.

As much as we try to wriggle our way out of situations that make us uncomfortable when it comes to expressing our opinions, we are allowed to have them. Opinions are not right or wrong, they just are; you might not have the most popular view, but you’re still allowed to have it. As Anne Frank put it, “People can tell you to keep your mouth shut, but that doesn’t stop you from having your own opinion.” It’s a valid statement; while I might not agree with you, that doesn’t mean you’re not entitled to that opinion, just like I’m entitled to mine regardless of whether or not we choose to vocalize it.


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I love this second strip. It shows how we feel dependent upon things to make our lives interesting, but in reality we have exactly what we need inside of ourselves. During the black out of 2003; we were completely out of power for a few days and at 10 years old, once my Game boy died, I was bored out of my mind.

I remember sitting in my living room with my parents and younger brother, candles surrounding us and asking my parents what they used to do back in the day for fun. It wasn’t until we just walked outside and found random things to do, that I realized that not having power wasn’t really that big of a deal. We ended up taking all of our freshly bought groceries over to a friend’s house with about 5 other families and cooked all the food we had. There were more than 20 of us, hanging out around the bonfire, enjoying a potluck, and running around through the woods. It truly showed me that I don’t need a certain toy or even electricity to have fun. Our imagination was enough.

Calvin thinks that he needs his wagon to make noise in order for it to be fun, but in the end he realizes that he and Hobbes can make all the racket needed to enjoy it. The excitement comes from within, even though oftentimes we don’t realize it.

-LP

P.S. If you’re interested in enjoying some more Calvin and Hobbes, click the link below.

Those Sunny Sunday Mornings

You don’t really realize how important music is to you until you stop listening to it.

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I went on a very long hiatus from listening to music and now that those tunes are back in my ears, I just can’t get enough. I didn’t realize how much I missed listening to artists from Tracy Chapman to Tina Turner, or The Moody Blues to The Temptations, or The Who (I’m pretending that I didn’t go through an embarrassingly long emo boy band phase, I’ve gotta keep that rep up, right?)

I have to say, my musical interests are extremely diverse. Some days, I want nothing more than to kick it old school with Motown; other days, like today, I jam out to 80’s music. After spending several years not really listening to much, I feel like I’ve been starving myself and now I’m just binging on everything. It feels amazing.

Growing up, music was essential. I have so many childhood memories of waking up on a Sunday morning with my dad playing some record on the record player. I would jump out of bed and run down the stairs to find him sitting on the sofa tapping his foot while he read the newspaper. He would give me a kiss on the cheek as I hopped into his lap and he would read the Sunday’s comics to me. Eventually I just couldn’t sit still anymore and I’d have to get up and dance around our living room to whatever was playing that day. I swear, those Sundays always seemed to be a bit sunnier, a bit happier; more full of life and laughter. Those Sundays were my favorite.

I grew up singing Big Girls Don’t Cry by Frankie Vallie & the Four Seasons in the car on trips to the store, or grabbing a handful of CD’s (he never cared which) and running out to the car before we left for vacation. We’d play in the backyard with a CD player playing anything from Motown to Classic Rock. Dad taught me about Bob Dylan and showed me that even if your voice doesn’t fit the societal norm of “perfection” that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t sing.

He made music a part of who I am. I’m not musically inclined; I can barely read sheet music, but I can appreciate some good lyrics and a wonderful tune. I can’t believe that I allowed myself to lose such a huge part of myself, but at least I found it again. At least I’m dancing around now to songs that remind me of back then, to songs that make me think of today, and songs that make me dream of the future.

I can’t help but sit here imagining myself boppin’ down the street with a boom box on my shoulder, crankin’ tunes, and singing along. A girl can dream… I’m pretty sure that those I live with would rather I not be listening to music because my singing is less than magical. Sorry guys! Girls just wanna have fun, am I right?

-LP